Drilling on ice or frozen ground

+2 votes
asked Feb 18, 2012 by thingles Kubblic ❚ (6,110 points)
I've read a bit on the best practices for drilling (spinning and attempting to dig into the dirt). When playing in the winter on ice or frozen ground it seems like the normal drilling method isn't always best. Sometimes I prefer to try and level out as it lands and slide instead of sticking since the stick sometimes causes things to bounce all over.

Any recommendations for best drilling throws on ice?
commented Mar 9, 2012 by Chad B Ironkubb ✭ (3,130 points)
Each playing surface can be different and the drill needs to be adjusted as such.  We saw several different surfaces at the MN Loppet tournament.  The different surfaces is what really puts the challenge in the game.  The team that adjusts the best to the playing surface will do well.
commented Mar 10, 2012 by Eric A. Kubblic ❚ (7,810 points)
Depending on the icy surface, I am not too sure that the drill is the best approach.
commented Mar 10, 2012 by thingles Kubblic ❚ (6,110 points)
Yeah, the question is probably better titled "What is the best way to control the kubb when throwing on frozen ground?". Intent is to achieve as much control as possible, but on hard ice pack.

4 Answers

+1 vote
answered Feb 21, 2012 by desmoineskubb Ironkubb ✭ (4,390 points)
selected Feb 21, 2012 by thingles
 
Best answer
I would suggest the "Minnesota Slide" for frozen ground without measureable amounts of snow. Drilling is too random and uncontrollable on permafrost.

Well, "MN Slide" is what we coined it when we were at the Loppet.

The "Minnesota Slide" - A drill method, without the nose down, impacting the pitch prior to the centerline, sliding across the line and bumping any kubbs that have already been thown.

We have ONE GUY in our entire club that is good at the slide. We will need to practice more for next season's winter tournament on the slide.
commented Feb 21, 2012 by thingles Kubblic ❚ (6,110 points)
That needs to be on the wiki.

http://wiki.planetkubb.com/wiki/Minnesota_slide
+1 vote
answered Feb 19, 2012 by garrickvanburen Kubblic ❚ (7,350 points)
edited Mar 4, 2012 by thingles

On frozen ground, I've been happy with the introduction of backspin. The Kubbs land with a thud and bounce/slide much less.

(ed: change Knight to Kubb)

commented Feb 19, 2012 by thingles Kubblic ❚ (6,110 points)
edited Mar 4, 2012 by thingles
Can you elaborate on backspin? How are you directing the Kubb to apply the backspin?
commented Feb 19, 2012 by garrickvanburen Kubblic ❚ (7,350 points)
edited Mar 4, 2012 by thingles
as the Kubb leaves my hand, I flick my wrist up just a touch.
+1 vote
answered Mar 5, 2012 by THansenite Ironkubb ✭ (2,660 points)
Drilling is ONLY good where the corners of the kubb can dig into the pitch.  Attemptint to drill into frozen ground or ice will only yield unpredictable bounces.  Even putting backspin on kubbs is risky since you don't know where, exactly, the kubb will hit the ground and can bounce erratically despite the backspin.  On frozen ground or ice, some sort of slide is going to be your best bet.

However, if the ground is frozen, but there is a little grass showing, I have found that a very low drill can work.  In the summer time, you generally want the kubb to hit the grass at a high angle of attack to dig into the ground.  In the winter, I have found that the kubb just bounces from the impact.  If there is grass, though, a low angle of attack can grab the kubb pretty well.  You just have to learn to play the surface.
commented Mar 5, 2012 by Dano Ironkubb ✭ (2,330 points)
very good point. It's more important to throw a few kubbs to warm up before a match then to practice 8 meter tosses. especially on a pitch you have not played on before. Gotta love that home court advantage.
commented Mar 7, 2012 by ChrisHodges Kubblic ❚ (7,300 points)
"Drilling is ONLY good where the corners of the kubb can dig into the pitch."

Disagree, depending on your definition of 'Drilling'. If you mean 'to augur the kubb as hard into the ground as possible' then I see your point, but I use it to refer to the spinning of the kubb which is used to stabilize  the kubb in flight (like a gyroscope) so that the profile and angle of impact are predictable, and in my opinion this is the right technique regardless of the surface.
commented Mar 7, 2012 by Dano Ironkubb ✭ (2,330 points)
nice to have people to discuss the finer points of Kubb with. At home everybody roles their eyes when I talk about the sport. For me the most important part of drilling is the tightness of the spiral. If my throw wobbles the landing and bounce get unpredictable. If my spiral is tight  I am usually pleased with the results.
0 votes
answered Jul 26, 2012 by Dobbie Kubblic ❚ (6,450 points)
Every few months or so I'd suggest "bumping" the last question for re-evaluation. Anyone have different opinions now? Anything changed since you last answered the question?
commented Jul 28, 2012 by thingles Kubblic ❚ (6,110 points)
We will all find out on Feb. 2, 2013. :-)

http://wiki.planetkubb.com/wiki/Twin_Cities_Winter_Tournament_2013
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